IMO2020 – Best practices, Guidelines for Port State Controls and more

Discussions with Shipping and Freight Resource

Maritime shipping has one of the lowest carbon emissions compared to other modes of transport..

Despite this, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the regulatory authority for international shipping, has been working to reduce the harmful impacts of shipping on the environment since the 1960s..

In April 2018, the IMO adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008 levels..

As part of this strategy, on January 1st 2020 IMO’s MARPOL Annex VI (colloquially known as IMO2020) regulated to lower the current global limit for sulphur content of marine fuels from 3.50% to 0.50% was implemented..

We caught up with Roel Hoenders, Acting Head of Air Pollution and Energy Efficiency, Sub-Division for Protective Measures, Marine Environment Division, with the IMO for his views on the implementation of the #IMO2020, and also to discuss the best practices and guidelines for Port State Controls (PSC)..

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Pitfalls of digitalisation in shipping and freight

Opinion Piece

Digitisation, Digitalisation, Digital Transformation are some buzz words that have recently taken the shipping and freight industry by storm..

Let’s take a quick look at what these terms mean and what it is all about..

While Digitalisation is inevitable in the industry, there are also some pitfalls and you can read about the pitfalls and how to avoid it here..

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One month old VLSFO already facing issues – #IMO2020

IMO2020 - shipping and freight resource

January 1st 2020 saw the implementation of IMO’s MARPOL Annex VI (colloquially known as IMO2020) regulated to lower the current global limit for sulphur content of marine fuels from 3.50% to 0.50%.. VLSFO (Very Low Sulphur Fuel Oil) is one of the options suggested by IMO to achieve this reduction..

Shipping lines and fuel companies have been trying and several blended fuels that would help achieve these levels..

But the one month old VLSFO is already facing issues relating to emissions..

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Maersk Honam becomes Maersk Halifax

shipping and freight news

Like the proverbial Phoenix rising from the ashes, Maersk Honam has a new lease on life as Maersk Halifax.. As has been reported quite elaborately here, on the 6th of March 2018, Maersk Honam, one of Maersk’s ultra-large container ships caught fire in the Arabian Sea between India’s West Coast and Oman while en-route from Singapore to Egypt..

Five crew members perished in this incident which was one of several maritime disasters which have container ships in recent history..

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Do you speak Maritime English..??

maritime english

A seafarer is never at the front or the back of a ship; they are at the bow or the stern. They are never on the left or right side, but rather port or starboard. They are never in their bedroom or the kitchen, but they might be in their cabin or in the galley. A ship’s speed is not measured in miles or kilometres per hour, but rather in knots. A ship, of course, is referred often as “she” and not always as “it”.

These are the things we might think of when we hear a phrase like “Maritime English”.

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Oops it happened again – another container ship on fire..!!

KMTC HongKong Fire - shipping and freight resource

2019 seems to be fast becoming the year of maritime disasters.. There have been several maritime disasters one after the other in the recent years, especially in 2019.. In the latest incident on the 25th of May, a fire broke out on board a container ship KMTC Hong Kong, at the Laem Chabang port in Thailand..

It has been reported that a fire erupted on the ship triggering a blast which left at least 25 workers suffering from smoke inhalation and other injuries, forcing officials to evacuate workers and temporarily close three piers..

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South Africa will remain on IMO White List

shipping and freight news

We reported previously that 75 countries may face the chop from the IMO “White List” for alleged non-compliance of the relevant provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978 (STCW)..

South Africa was one among the 75 countries and naturally SAMSA (South African Maritime Safety Authority) was quite concerned and had taken the matter seriously.. 

It has emerged now that through a series of discussions with the IMO, SAMSA (South African Maritime Safety Authority) has managed to pull back this de-listing.. 🙂 

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75 countries may face the chop from the IMO “White List”

Shipping and Freight Resource - News

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) maintains a “White List” which is a list of member states (countries) who have confirmed to the IMO’s Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) to be following the relevant provisions of the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Seafarers, 1978 (STCW).. A position on the White List means that certificates issued by or … Read more here..

Do you support mandatory regulation of ship speeds..??

what is your opinion

As at the time of writing of this article, 244 days is what is left before ships have to comply with #IMO2020 (I actually put up a countdown on my sidebar)..

What IMO2020 is, has been discussed in detail across many articles on this blog, so I won’t repeat in great detail..

An open letter to IMO Member States by NGOs has expressed strong support for the IMO to implement mandatory regulation of global ship speeds differentiated across ship type and size categories..

Industry experts especially in container shipping seem divided on this.. Do you support mandatory regulation of ship speeds..??

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