Panama and Suez Canals offer cost reductions for COVID-19

shipping and freight news

While the COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect and disrupt industries, jobs, lives, and economies around the world, there also seems to be a good fightback from the various industries, governments, and organisations.

Shipping lines have been offering time-sensitive cost-saving options for COVID-19 along with some relief in demurrage and detention charges etc.. Governments have been given tax breaks and business rescue packages to those most affected.

Now it seems to be the turn of the two main canals that serve the shipping and freight industry – the Panama Canal and the Suez Canal.

These canals save shipowners costs in terms of the transit, in terms of fuel costs, and also assists in reducing the carbon footprint of the transiting ships but of course both these canals have toll charges for the transit of ships.

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Seafarers – We Need You, We Hear You, We Support You!

Imagine leaving your loved ones, boarding a ship (for what you thought was a specified time) and now, not knowing when you will be able to return.

This is the plight of thousands of seafarers the world over, who are working on ships so that you can get everything you need – food, medicines, supplies, provisions, etc.

Everything you see around you has (in all probability), at some point, traversed by sea and made its way to you.

The invisible workforce that makes your life comfortable and convenient are the more than 1.6 million seafarers around the world operating to keep the supply lines moving and alive.

Today on Labour Day, we pay tribute to these brave souls, the backbone of the maritime industry.

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Say hello to HMM Algeciras, the largest container vessel on earth

shipping and freight news

What started out as an effort to optimise on economy and efficiency with an environmental touch in 2013 with the introduction of the Triple E series ships soon became kind of a mine-is-bigger-than-yours showboating..

Between 2013 and 2019 there were 8 “largest container vessel in the world” title holders operated by some of the world’s largest container shipping lines..

The increase in TEU capacity in the last 6 years within this ULCV class is around 5,964 TEUs which is the size of a regular container vessel still operating in many of the world’s trades now..

On the 23rd of April 2020, HMM became the latest entrant to this size race when they held a naming ceremony for their first 24,000 TEU containership – the latest largest container ship on earth – the ‘HMM Algeciras’..

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IMO and PSCs adopt a pragmatic approach to ship inspections

IMO - shipping and freight resource

In a press release yesterday, IMO and PSC inspection authorities announced that they have set a pragmatic approach to support global supply chain..

The port State control (PSC) regimes which carry out inspections onboard ships to monitor and enforce compliance with international regulations have highlighted their commitment to ensuring shipping continues to trade safely, securely and efficiently during the coronavirus pandemic, while respecting the important role of seafarers as key workers and protecting the environment.

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IMO calls for seafarers to be designated as “key workers” during COVID-19

Press Release - Shipping and Freight Resource

Ships and ports need to remain fully operational in order to maintain complete functionality of supply chains..

Governments and their relevant national authorities should therefore engage with appropriate stakeholders within their national shipping and ports sectors to discuss arrangements for the continued facilitation of international maritime trade, including port hinterland connections..

This is one of the recommendations of the IMO alongwith recommendations that seafarers be designated as “key workers providing essential services” during the COVID-19 pandemic allowing them exemptions from national travel or movement restrictions in order to facilitate their joining or leaving ships..

Is your country already following or about to follow this especially when you are under lockdown with COVID-19..?? Let’s take a quick survey shall we..??

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COVID-19 Update – Transnet Port Terminals declare Force Majeure

COVID-19 - Force Majeure

On the 23rd of March 2020, the President of South Africa Cyril Ramaphosa declared a nationwide lock-down as of the midnight of Thursday 26th March 2020..

The lockdown is part of South Africa’s bid to contain and slow down the spread of Coronavirus COVID-19 in the country and enforces a total lockdown on all services with exception of essential services as defined in the Regulations issued on the 25th of March 2020..

In line with these regulations, Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) announced that they will remain operational to support the transportation of essential goods and services as well as those goods and services that support the production or provision of those essential goods and services to the country..

Citing the unforeseen impact of COVID-19 as beyond their control, TPT has advised their customers that they are invoking the provisions of the Force Majeure clauses in TPT’s commercial agreements and Standard Trading Terms and Conditions..

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Cape Town Agreement comes into force

Shipping and Freight Resource Press Release

The Torremolinos Declaration  on fishing vessel safety and combating IUU fishing has now reached 51 signatories.

The entry into force of IMO’s Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety will be crucial for improved safety at sea for fishers and will support the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

During a European Union High-level Ministerial Maritime Conference in Opatija, Croatia (10-11 March), participants including IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim highlighted the urgent need to bring the Cape Town Agreement into force.

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Difference between Maritime, Shipping, Freight, Logistics and Supply Chain

To the uninitiated (which included me at one stage), these industries are same or similar and it might come across that there is no difference between Maritime, Shipping, Freight, Logistics and Supply Chain ..

But once you are involved in the business or know about these businesses, you will very soon understand that these are very different industries with different workings, assets, architecture, requiring very different sets of qualifications, experience, expertise, knowledge and attitudes..

In this article I unpack the difference between Maritime, Shipping, Freight, Logistics and Supply Chain and how it is all connected..

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IMO2020 – Best practices, Guidelines for Port State Controls and more

Discussions with Shipping and Freight Resource

Maritime shipping has one of the lowest carbon emissions compared to other modes of transport..

Despite this, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the regulatory authority for international shipping, has been working to reduce the harmful impacts of shipping on the environment since the 1960s..

In April 2018, the IMO adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008 levels..

As part of this strategy, on January 1st 2020 IMO’s MARPOL Annex VI (colloquially known as IMO2020) regulated to lower the current global limit for sulphur content of marine fuels from 3.50% to 0.50% was implemented..

We caught up with Roel Hoenders, Acting Head of Air Pollution and Energy Efficiency, Sub-Division for Protective Measures, Marine Environment Division, with the IMO for his views on the implementation of the #IMO2020, and also to discuss the best practices and guidelines for Port State Controls (PSC)..

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