Defeating demurrage and detention with data – Register for the Webcast

To many customers around the world, demurrage and detention costs represent some of the most expensive fees that they will incur in the process of a trade transaction..

Although demurrage and detention are not standard charges that are applicable on every shipment, there are many shipments on which these charges are levied..

They are probably two terms that top the list of controversial charges levied by shipping lines on customers..

The seriousness of demurrage and detention charges is evident when you consider that EVERY shipment has the potential to incur both these charges during loading and unloading..

Demurrage and Detention really are avoidable costs and it is something that can be defeated with data..

Learn exactly how, in a webcast which focuses on ways and means customers can reduce and/or avoid demurrage and detention charges through the effective usage of data..

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Shipping your first container..?? Here are some tips to help you

first time

In anything that we do in life, the first time is a scary thought – first time on a bike, first time driving a car, first time swimming, first date, first kiss ……………….. etc..

So why should shipping your first container be any different..??

It could be a scary thought if you are a first-time exporter or importing for the first time, but like everything else, if done and handled correctly, shipping your first container can be a good experience as well..

Here are some tips to assist you in shipping your first container..

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Liner and Tramp Service – similarities and differences

liner and tramp

Currently, there are more than 55,000 merchant ships plying global trade around the world..

These ships include General Cargo ships, Bulk and Break Bulk ships, Container ships, Chemical, Oil and LNG Tankers, Passenger, and various other types of ships..

While these are types of ships, these ships could be operating on two main types of services – Liner and Tramp services..

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Should the Captain of the Wakashio be held responsible for dead dolphins

wakashio oil spill

Any maritime disaster will have severe impact on assets, people and environment.. The effects of the oil spill from the Wakashio is beginning to manifest itself as there have been several reports of dead dolphins washing ashore on the beaches of Mauritius, even as the bow of the ship has been scuttled and sunk about 14 nautical miles of where the incident happened..

The Captain of the Wakashio has been arrested and charged and currently faces a possible 60 year jail term for failing to safely navigate the vessel in Mauritius waters..

What is your opinion..?? Should the Captain of the ship be responsible for this incident and is a possible 60 year jail term (if convicted) justified..??

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Insurers share details of webinar on causation of container ship casualties

News - Shipping and Freight Resource

As I wrote in my previous article about the importance of proper lashing of containers onboard ships, there is increased concern and focus on the safety of the ship, its crew and the cargo..

The concern is especially amplified considering the many maritime disasters that have happened in the last few years, some of which have been reported in detail on this site..

A few of the incidents that involved containers falling of a ship have been attributed to the lashing of containers onboard or lack thereof..

Considering the intense strain that the extent and pace of growth in container volumes has placed on a wide range of operational procedures and the physical hardware employed to handle these volumes, the Thomas Miller managed insurance mutuals, container freight specialist TT Club and protection & indemnity insurer, UK P&I Club organised a Webinar to discuss the diverse range of factors important to safe container ship operations and the security of the container stacks they carry..

Here are the details..

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Synopsis of the webinar on the future of global supply chains

synopsis of the webinar on the future of global supply chains - shipping and freight resource

The latest WTO statistics say that world trade is expected to fall by between 13% and 32% in 2020 as the COVID 19 pandemic disrupts normal economic activity and life around the world. A resilient supply chain is essential to ensure a strong global trade.

Our survey on the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the supply chain industry revealed how vulnerable the industry was with the results showing that 35% of the market was totally unprepared for it and 59% of the market was severely impacted by it.

Based on these results, on the 4th of June 2020, we organised a Webinar sponsored by Ocean Insights on how the future of global supply chains would look.

This webinar, hosted by Eric Johnson, Senior Technology Editor of the JOC featured Steve Kranig of IM-EX Global, Inc., Pritam Banerjee of Asian Development Bank and Robin Jaacks of Ocean Insights as panelists.

For those of who missed out on this insightful and informative webinar, here is a synopsis of what was discussed.

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The marvel that is Panama Canal, how it works and why it is important to global trade..

Panama Canal - shipping and freight resource

There is a tiny isthmus (narrow strip of land with sea on either side, forming a link between two larger areas of land) lying between the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans connecting North and South America called the Isthmus of Panama..

This isthmus is of strategic importance to global trade and the world of shipping because it contains the country of Panama and the Panama Canal..

Panama is home to the largest ship registry in the world, whereas the Panama Canal is of huge significance to the shipping industry..

Capt.Ricardo Caballero Vega – a maritime pilot transiting ships across the Panama Canal for 25 years explains why..

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South Africa – COVID-19 Lockdown Situation Update – 25.04.2020

COVID-19 South Africa

South Africa has been on lockdown due to the COVID-19 pandemic since the 27th of March 2020 and as of date, South Africa has 4220 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with 79 deaths..

Below is the gist of President Cyril Ramaphosa’s address to the nation on the 23rd of April 2020 and details relevant to the risk-adjusted strategy for the resumption of economic activity in the country..

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UPDATE : Cargo movement during South Africa lockdown – What is allowed and not allowed

information from shipping and freight resource

As all of you are aware, South Africa has been on lockdown for COVID-19 since the 27th of March 2020.. The lockdown period has now been extended from the 16th of April 2020 to the 30th of April 2020..

From the time the first case of COVID-19 was announced in South Africa on the 5th of March 2020, there have been several changes in the regulations governing the shipping landscape in SA..

Here is where things are sitting as of the 12th of April 2020 in South Africa..

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COVID-19 – How to manage working from home

Opinion Piece

As per reports, currently all countries in the world are affected by COVID-19 some worse than others..

As per BBC reports “The WHO said it took more than three months to reach the first 100,000 confirmed cases worldwide, but only 12 days to reach 200,000, four days to reach 300,000 and three days to reach 400,000.”

While preventive measures are essential, the concept of having to work from home, social distancing and isolation brings with it new challenges for both the employees and employers on how this must all be handled..

No one in the world was prepared for such a separation..

Even in the businesses of shipping, freight, maritime, logistics and supply chain which are considered as essential services around the world, many people are working from home due to this pandemic..

If you are one of the millions of people working from home due to this pandemic here are some pointers on how to manage it effectively..

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Susan Oatway – First female Chairman of Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers

Education is an important requirement in any field in order for anyone to learn about that field and put that learning to work.. Such education and learning may or may not be formal depending on various circumstances..

Education and learning in the Shipping, Freight and Logistics industry is no different to any other industry and in my opinion, there are not many options for formal education in our industry compared to other industries..

There is, however, one professional body that has been working hard not just to fill this gap but also to set the highest standards of professional service to the shipping industry worldwide through education, example and discipline and that body is the Institute of Chartered Shipbrokers..

The Institute has now appointed Susan Oatway (FICS) as its first female Chairman.. I caught up with Susan and this is what she had to say..

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