MSC becomes the first casualty of IMO’s Carriage Ban

IMO Carriage Ban - shipping and freight resource

We previously reported that as part of MARPOL Annex VI regulation (IMO2020), the member states of the International Maritime Organisation adopted a complementary amendment which came into effect on the 1st of March 2020..

The “Carriage Ban” as it is called, prohibits the carriage of non-compliant HSFO (Heavy Sulphur Fuel Oil) for purposes of propulsion or operation on board a ship unless the ship has been fitted with an exhaust gas cleaning system – EGCS commonly known as scrubber..

As from this date it will be considered an offense for any ship to be carrying fuel that contains sulphur content higher than 0.5% for purposes of propulsion or operation, unless the ship has a scrubber..

In the previous article, we raised a question “Will the IMO, which remained steadfast in its implementation of the IMO2020 regulation from 1st Jan 2020 also remain steadfast with the implementation of the “Carriage Ban” come 1st March 2020..??”..

Well it seemingly has..

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Cape Town Agreement comes into force

Shipping and Freight Resource Press Release

The Torremolinos Declaration  on fishing vessel safety and combating IUU fishing has now reached 51 signatories.

The entry into force of IMO’s Cape Town Agreement on fishing vessel safety will be crucial for improved safety at sea for fishers and will support the fight against illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing.

During a European Union High-level Ministerial Maritime Conference in Opatija, Croatia (10-11 March), participants including IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim highlighted the urgent need to bring the Cape Town Agreement into force.

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IMO Carriage Ban comes into effect and 5 beneficial changes of IMO2020

IMO - shipping and freight resource

The much reported MARPOL Annex VI regulation (a.k.a IMO2020) which was implemented to lower the current global limit for sulphur content of marine fuels from 3.50% to 0.50% came into effect on 1st January 2020..

As of 1st March 2020, the complementary International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution form ships (MARPOL) amendment (Carriage Ban) came into effect..

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Carriage ban looming for ship owners and operators – IMO2020

The much reported MARPOL Annex VI regulation (a.k.a IMO2020) which was implemented to lower the current global limit for sulphur content of marine fuels from 3.50% to 0.50% came into effect on 1st January 2020..

This reduction in sulphur content is supposed to be achieved by way of

  • Using low-sulphur compliant fuel oil;
  • Using gas as a fuel as when ignited it leads to negligible sulphur oxide emissions;
  • Using methanol as an alternative fuel as being used on some short sea services; or
  • Using exhaust gas cleaning systems or “scrubbers”, which “clean” the emissions before they are released into the atmosphere

There is however another part of this regulation which is the “Carriage Ban” which comes into effect from 1st of March 2020..

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IMO2020 – Best practices, Guidelines for Port State Controls and more

Discussions with Shipping and Freight Resource

Maritime shipping has one of the lowest carbon emissions compared to other modes of transport..

Despite this, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the regulatory authority for international shipping, has been working to reduce the harmful impacts of shipping on the environment since the 1960s..

In April 2018, the IMO adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008 levels..

As part of this strategy, on January 1st 2020 IMO’s MARPOL Annex VI (colloquially known as IMO2020) regulated to lower the current global limit for sulphur content of marine fuels from 3.50% to 0.50% was implemented..

We caught up with Roel Hoenders, Acting Head of Air Pollution and Energy Efficiency, Sub-Division for Protective Measures, Marine Environment Division, with the IMO for his views on the implementation of the #IMO2020, and also to discuss the best practices and guidelines for Port State Controls (PSC)..

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A day in the life of a Seafarer 2 – #seafarersmatter

Day of the Seafarer #seafarersmatter

As you know, the 25th of June every year is celebrated as the DAY OF THE SEAFARER under the auspices of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO)..

Day of the Seafarer (DotS as it has come to be known), is celebrated to recognize the unique contribution made by seafarers from all over the world to international seaborne trade, the world economy and civil society as a whole and to let the world know how and why #SeafarersMatter and are indispensable to everyone..

In my previous post promoting this Day of the Seafarer, I shared with you the story of Nick Chubb MNI, a former Merchant Seafarer and how he spends “A Day in the Life of a Seafarer”..

This article comes right from the top, yes from a Captain himself.. Capt.Abhishek Nair recounts the life of a Captain on board a ship..

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A day in the life of a Seafarer 1 – #seafarersmatter

Day of the Seafarer #seafarersmatter

The 25th of June every year is celebrated as the DAY OF THE SEAFARER under the auspices of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO)..

Day of the Seafarer (DotS as it has come to be known), is celebrated to recognize the unique contribution made by seafarers from all over the world to international seaborne trade, the world economy and civil society as a whole and to let the world know how and why #SeafarersMatter and are indispensable to everyone..

This is an article about a typical day in the life of a seafarer on the occasion of the Day of the Seafarer..

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Day of the Seafarer 2017 and why #seafarersmatter

Day of the Seafarer #seafarersmatter

In recognition of the seafarer’s contribution to global trade, every year on the 25th of June the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) celebrates DAY OF THE SEAFARER to celebrate seafarers and let the world know how and why seafarers are indispensable to everyone..

Here’s why #seafarersmatter and how you can assist in acknowledging their services to the industry..

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What is SOLAS VGM – Verified Gross Mass..??

Featured Image for container weight infographic

In November 2014 the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) amended SOLAS (Safety of Life At Sea convention) Chapter VI Regulation 2 to tighten up the process of weighing containerised cargoes and declaring the correct weights after verification..

What is this SOLAS (Safety of Life At Sea convention) Chapter VI Regulation 2 and what does this amendment mean to the day to day shipping industry..??

This article gives you an infographic which will clear it all.. 🙂

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