Cutting GHG emission from shipping – 10 years of mandatory rules

IMO - shipping and freight resource

2021 marks a decade of action since IMO adopted the first set of mandatory energy efficiency measures for ships.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is marking a decade of action on cutting greenhouse gas emissions from shipping, since the first set of international mandatory measures to improve ships’ energy efficiency was adopted on 15 July 2011, as part of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL).

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IMO working group agrees further measures to cut ship emissions

Press Release

Proposed amendments to the MARPOL convention would require ships to combine a technical and an operational approach to reduce their carbon intensity​.

Draft new mandatory measures to cut the carbon intensity of existing ships have been agreed by an International Maritime Organization (IMO) working group.

This marks a major step forward, building on current mandatory energy efficiency requirements to further reduce greenhouse gas emissions from shipping.

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IMO2020 – Best practices, Guidelines for Port State Controls and more

Discussions with Shipping and Freight Resource

Maritime shipping has one of the lowest carbon emissions compared to other modes of transport..

Despite this, the International Maritime Organization (IMO), the regulatory authority for international shipping, has been working to reduce the harmful impacts of shipping on the environment since the 1960s..

In April 2018, the IMO adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008 levels..

As part of this strategy, on January 1st 2020 IMO’s MARPOL Annex VI (colloquially known as IMO2020) regulated to lower the current global limit for sulphur content of marine fuels from 3.50% to 0.50% was implemented..

We caught up with Roel Hoenders, Acting Head of Air Pollution and Energy Efficiency, Sub-Division for Protective Measures, Marine Environment Division, with the IMO for his views on the implementation of the #IMO2020, and also to discuss the best practices and guidelines for Port State Controls (PSC)..

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